Feb 27

Just A Farm Boy

By Kenneth Feucht books 3 Comments »

Scan 2016-2-27 20.59.06

Just A Farm Boy, by Samuel Jacob Feucht ★★★★★

First of all, I don’t dare rate this as anything less than five stars, since my father wrote this book. As he was getting up in age, we talked him into writing a book of his life, and the two oldest brothers Dennis and Lewis helped him get this produced and printed. Sadly, I only have one copy of this book, and the binding is falling apart. I will probably have it spiral bound, and then try to get the word processing file from Dennis. I hope that he still has it.

Dad had a very interesting life. He loved to tell stories, and this book reads very similar to how dad used to tell stories about his life. He was born in the northwest corner of Iowa on a farm with 14 siblings. He left home in his early twenties, first going to Illinois, then California, then back to the midwest, then a brief time back in southern California, before settling in to Portland, Oregon for the rest of his life.

Dad was a wonderful man. He was multi-faceted, and was able to survive frequent poor health with stomach problems, had some very unfortunate bad luck, such as being zoned out of business in Baldwin Park, CA, but overall, troubles did not seem to keep him down, and his faith in Christ sustained him.

Dad expressed a number of times how he often wished that he could have remained in southern California. The family couldn’t have been more grateful that he got out of California and settled in the beautiful northwest.

Though I had glanced over this book a number of times, I found that this reading of the book, complete at one sitting, filled in a number of episodes in dad’s life that I had either forgot about or simply glossed over. There are many areas of his life in which he should have given more details, such as details about his parents, his life in California, his coming to faith, his meeting mom, and their early life together, as well as events that surrounded our lives when we were very young children.

I wish that he had imparted to us more of his skill at the care of farm animals, but that wasn’t to be. It is not uncommon for me to be sitting around and realize that I miss my parents, both dad and mom. I’m grateful that dad took the time to chronicle at least part of his life for his children and posterity.

 

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Sep 07

BlackHills2014-33

This blog is a combination of two activities, the first being a visit of Betsy and I to our daughter Rachel and her husband and two daughters, who live in Sioux Center, Iowa, and the second being a bicycle trip I did with the Adventure Cycle Association in the Black Hills, starting in Rapid City, South Dakota. The bicycle trip begins at the 30AUG spot, so if you are only interested in that, please skip down everything else.

23aug We decided to head to Iowa early in the morning on Saturday, rather than late on Friday. At the very last minute, Betsy and I both decided to take a slightly longer route, which went first to Portland, and then out the Columbia River highway. The alternative would have been to go over Snoqualmie Pass through Yakima and Tri-Cities. We drove down through Pendleton, Baker, Ontario, Boise, and finally settled in for the night at Mountain Home, Idaho. I don’t take photos from the car, so no photos were obtained today.

24aug Today was a long, hard day of driving, never getting on an interstate highway at all until the last five miles. We left Mountain Home on a side road that took us through the Craters of the Moon National Monument. Betsy had never seen this, and it was not a major delay in going this way as compared to simply taking the interstate to Idaho Falls. Once we reached Idaho Falls, we continued on the road that followed the Snake River to the Grand Tetons. I’ve traveled this road before, having gone a number of times to a church associated Labor Day Weekend Youth Rally on this road, located just before the Wyoming border. Driving up through the Tetons, we then entered Yellowstone Park, and left out the east entrance towards Cody. Oddly, I felt that many areas of the Northwest were far more beautiful and spectacular than Yellowstone NP. We then headed north on route 14a through the Bighorn Mountains. I had thought that I did this route before, but apparently not, and must have done the straight route 14. 14a went through Lovell, but then is a ridiculously steep climb for over ten miles, throwing us into snow, and the tops of the mountain peaks. It was most grand, and created dreams of the ultimate challenge bicycle ride. I love the Bighorns, in my estimation one of the most beautiful spots in the Rockies. We then hit a long, steep descent which put us into Sheridan, Wyoming where we spent the night.

25aug today was mostly driving on I-90, with the exception of a bypass the see the Devil’s Tower. Betsy and I took a walk around the tower and then quickly dashed back to I-90 to get to Alex and Rachel. Only a stop in Sturgis to get lunch held us from getting to Sioux Center at about 8 pm, weary and ready for bed. But, what a delight it was to see the children (we include Alex in that) and grandchildren.

26aug Today was a lazy day, with me riding around town with Alex, doing a short bicycle ride with him, and then grilling steaks on the barbeque.

Lily

Lily

Adalyn

Adalyn

27aug Today was another lazy day, with a visit to the foreign candy company, as well another bicycle ride. We had lunch at Culvers in memory of Diane.

28aug Today we went to Lester to visit the relatives. We were invited to Wes and Esther’s for lunch. Also at lunch were Phil and Donna Mogler, Wes’s mother, Alex, Caleb, and Tessa. Uncle Phil has always been a wonderful memory to me as far back as when I was 3-4 years old. Wes and Esther have been  most special cousins to our family, and I always try to see them when I come to Iowa. After a fantastic lunch with the most delicious Iowa corn, we had heavenly apple pie. Esther then took us to see the town of Lester with some brief stops, and then to see Roy and Melissa, as well as Tim and Carissa. Tim and Carissa were homeschooling their 5 children, all of them most wonderful kids, who were living in the original home of Carl and Pauline, where dad and all the aunts and uncles on that side of the family were born. The house was quite remodeled, with walls moved and additions added, but it still felt like the old homestead. The house looked like a school, as the children were being home-schooled. What a delight it was to see old relations. My only regret is that we didn’t have either time or opportunity to see more relatives in the area. Dinner was at Pizza Ranch in Sioux Center, since Alex needed to go to a major fireman’s meeting.

Phil and Donna Mogler

Phil and Donna Mogler

Esther, Wes and Grandma Moser

Esther, Wes and Grandma Moser

Roy Feucht showing off his high heel cowboy boots

Roy Feucht showing off his high heel cowboy boots

Roy and Melissa Feucht

Roy and Melissa Feucht

Tim and Carissa Feucht and family. The house is the original homestead where my father as well as uncles & aunts were born

Tim and Carissa Feucht and family. The house is the original homestead where my father as well as uncles & aunts were born

Tim and Carissa Feucht family

Tim and Carissa Feucht family

29aug This was my last full day in Sioux Center. It was mostly a lazy day, packing and getting ready for the bicycle trip, as I tend to forget things. In the evening, we had dinner at Archies in LeMars, followed by Blue Bunny ice cream at the Blue Bunny fountain. Archies, by the way, is steak to die for, if you didn’t know that already. In the evening, we had a wonderful time with Alex’s parents, as well as with Kurt and Colleen, who came over (Kurt) for a cigar and beer. It was a wonderful way to end my time with Alex and Rachel.

30aug Today was an early rise, and long, six hour drive to Rapid City, where my cycle ride was to begin. We had the usual formalities, including the explanation of the next day’s ride, as well as dinner. I crashed early. That night had some heavy rains, high winds, and thunderstorms, which I haven’t seen in a while. The ole REI tent held up well, and I was able to wake up dry.

Patrick, the bicycle mechanic

Patrick, the bicycle mechanic

Doug, the luggage manager, always the most friendly dude.

Doug, the luggage manager, always the most friendly dude.

The daily board

The daily board

Tony Neaves, a superb leader of the pack.

Tony Neaves, a superb leader of the pack.

Fetching dinner with Tony and Lou

Fetching dinner with Tony and Lou

 

 

31aug This was our first day of riding, and supposedly the hilliest and hardest. There was moderate climbing, but it was fairly straightforward.  I arrived at the campsite just west of Deadwood at about 13:30, so had time to shower, read, and enjoy a cigar. Dinner was based on the Chinese theme, though not like anything we’ve ever had in China. It was another quiet evening, ready for tomorrow.

On the road, ever upwards

On the road, ever upwards

One of the smaller towns in South Dakota

One of the smaller towns in South Dakota

Arriving at last in Deadwood

Arriving at last in Deadwood


01 sept Labor Day! Deadwood to Hill City. Today was almost completely on a non-paved gravel road, the Mikelson Trail. Riding was made a little more complex by the presence of rain, which made the fine gravel act a bit more like mud, the tires sometimes sinking up to a half inch into the trail. There were several climbs that we were told would be no more than 2 percent grade bit were actually between 3-4 percent grade. Compounded by the muddy gravel, it was a bit of work to get over those hills. The ride was gorgeous in spite of the grey clouds and rain. The day ended with cold but beautiful ble skies, which dried out all of our equipment.

On the Mickelson Trail

On the Mickelson Trail

Kathy pausing for a photo opportunity

Kathy pausing for a photo opportunity

Somewhat wet trail in forested area

Somewhat wet trail in forested area

The trail opening up into prairie

The trail opening up into prairie

 

02sept Hill City to Hot Springs. This AM, it was so cold I was freezing. I wore normal clothes for the ride, but had to constantly blow into my hands to warm them up. First stop was Crazy Horse state park. I only went to the entrance to get some photographs. Oddly, I had seen the Crazy Horse monument 35 some years ago, and it didn’t seem to be and further along to completion as 35 years ago. I rode onward. I missed a turn onto Argyle Road, and went about 1.5 miles too far before figuring out what I did.  Argyle Road was off the Mickelson Trail, and was a normal road through the countryside, but gravel. The gravel was very loose in spots, and it was over 10 miles of this stuff. The only good thing about it was that it was mostly downhill, though there was rolling hills, with occasional 8-10 percent grade. This was granny gear country!  The temperature was easing over 90F as I rolled into camp, and there was practically no shade… One time I would have easily settled for a hotel. I finally found a cool, comfortable spot and refused to move. Cold beer never tasted so good.

One of several tunnels on the trail

One of several tunnels on the trail

The trail now following a creek. Gold mining was still happening off of this creek

The trail now following a creek. Gold mining was still happening off of this creek

Verruckter Pferd (Crazy Horse). Not much work on it since I saw it last 35 years ago.

Verruckter Pferd (Crazy Horse). Not much work on it since I saw it last 35 years ago.

Rock formations off the path, awaiting a sculptor.

Rock formations off the path, awaiting a sculptor.

 

03sept Hot Springs to Custer State Park. Today started a bit chilly but soon warmed up, since it was climbing from the get-go. The first stop was at the Wind Caves, but I decided against doing a 1.5 hour tour and rode on. Soon, a group of us riders encountered a herd of buffalo in the road, and needed to wait over forty minutes for them to move off. It was rather crazy being only about five meters from very large buffalo, but they didn’t seem to mind us. We again encountered buffalo at the water stop, where the entire stop was overrun by  buffalo, making it necessary for them to bring in the water jugs, since the buffalo were quite interested in them. Moving into Custer State Park, it was quite woody and mountainous, giving us a very long steep climb over “Heartbreak Hill”. The remainder of the ride was nearly completely downhill into camp.

Bison statues in the town of Custer

Bison statues in the town of Custer

Entering Wind Cave National Park

Entering Wind Cave National Park

Bison in the prairie

Bison in the prairie

Bison obstructing the road. We had to wait 40+ minutes for them to move off the road

Bison obstructing the road. We had to wait 40+ minutes for them to move off the road

Bison raiding the water stop

Bison raiding the water stop

Federal regulations demand you stay a minimum of 25 meters from buffalo. We were within 5-10 meters to them.

Federal regulations demand you stay a minimum of 25 meters from buffalo. We were within 5-10 meters to them.

Buffalo Ken

Buffalo Ken

Custer State Park. I didn't see any buffalo in the state park.

Custer State Park. I didn’t see any buffalo in the state park.

 

04sept. Custer State Park to Hill City  My impression from the sounds of the night was that it had rained. It was darker than usual for my 6am wakeup, and I thought I was going to have a cold drizzly day. The sound of the babbling brook only a few feet from the tent did not help. Instead, I found it to be warm outside, a cloudless sky, and the first (and only) time the tent was totally dry. After breakfast, the ride included a moderate amount of climbing, but nothing difficult, until we arrived at Keystone, the gateway to Mt. Rushmore. A few of my friends decided to bicycle to the top, several later regretting that decision, though I was thoroughly impressed with them, as it is a four mile, 4-10 percent grade, not an easy task. My bicycle and I were shuttled to the Mt. Rushmore visitor center, got the obligatory photos, and then headed down. The last ten miles to Hill City paralleled a historic steam engine that connected Keystone and Hill City, though our time was faster than the train. We then camped in the same Hill City campground as earlier in the tour. That evening, the beer was complementary, and well enjoyed. I also was able to enjoy cigars with Cyndi and Matt.

The Presidents.

The Presidents.

 

05sept Hill City to Rapid City. After a quick breakfast, we discovered everybody usually anxious to get on the trail. Thus, we found that we were among the last to leave camp, though still among the first to arrive in Rapid City. The route was on a beautiful backroad that wrapped around Lake Sheridan, and then took the Sheridan Lake Road into town. There was a moderate amount of climbing, though not enough to work up a sweat, and since it was mostly downhill, we had arrived at the water break site having not yet consumed any water or even digested breakfast. We arrived in Rapid City by 9:30am. After telling new friends goodby, I went to get Betsy. She was staying with Alex, Rachel and family in a Rapid City hotel with a connecting water park. They had also had the opportunity to see much of the Black Hills, though from a car, and not a bicycle. It was hard to tell them goodby, especially Lily and Adalyn, whom Betsy and I have fallen in love with. By evening, we were able to make it to Butte, Montana.

06sept Home…. We headed out from Butte at about 7:15 and arrived home at 3:30 in the afternoon. We quickly unpacked the car, and I then downloaded our photos, and started to write this blog.  The trip was super, but it’s always nice to be home.

How would I rate the Adventure Cycling part of the trip? In my eyes, it was superb. They give you enough freedom to let you ride according to your own personal style. They feed you very well. One always meets new friends that you enjoy riding with. The routes are never terribly challenging, though still demanding. They stick to their name of truly making every trip an adventure. I would rate this trip as highly successful, and a superb way to end up the riding season (for major trips).

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Jul 27

1. Adventure #1 – cycling with Aaron in the Willamette Valley 12-13JUL2013

Oddly, I didn’t get any cycling photos, as I didn’t want to carry a heavy camera along, and I was riding my new Gran Feuchto, which doesn’t have any racks.  You can see the course of the rides for each of the two days here…

a) Saturday

b) Sunday 

Here of some photos that were taken while NOT riding…

Aaron and I relaxing on the back porch

Aaron and I relaxing on the back porch

Aaron reading in the backyard Hammock

Aaron reading in the backyard Hammock

Anita in the garden. They have raised gardens.

Anita shows her green thumb in the garden. They have raised gardens.

The backyard greenhouse

The backyard greenhouse

Aaron built a shed in the backyard with an extension to hold a hammock. A MOST brilliant idea!

Aaron built a shed in the backyard with an extension to hold a hammock. A MOST brilliant idea!

2. Adventure #2 – Backpacking with the Flanagan Grandchildren to Summit Lake 19-20JULY2013.

I had promised Patrick and Sammy a backpacking trip this year, but wasn’t feeling in tiptop shape so decided on a shorter hike, 2.5 miles but mostly straight up. We decided that since the hike was short, we would also take Ethan. The kids were a total joy to have along, watching them discover the delights of getting out into the wild and discovering the unknown.

Summit Lake. The hill in the background is what we were standing on in the next photo.

Summit Lake. The hill in the background is what we were standing on in the next photo.

A wonderful view of Mt. Rainier from Summit Hill

A wonderful view of Mt. Rainier from Summit Hill

 

The loop around the lake without our packs on

The loop around the lake without our packs on

 

Patrick in great style. The kids were frequently preoccupied with the snow.

Patrick in great style. The kids were frequently preoccupied with the snow.

 

Massive fields of glacier lilies were noted. They grow only in a small region of the NW.

Massive fields of glacier lilies were noted. They grow only in a small region of the NW.

Tired children reluctant to wake up the next morning.

Tired children reluctant to wake up the next morning.

Three happy children and one happy dad at the end of the trip.

Three happy children and one happy dad at the end of the trip.

This was the first trip in which I was able to utilize my new camera, an EOS M. It is a mirrorless camera, with the same resolution and controls as most of the EOS rebel line, 18 MPixel, APC format, but with interchangeable lenses. Its action in focusing and taking photos is a little slow, which okay for mostly scenic and landscape photos. There is no flash, but I have a very small flash designed to work with the camera. One can also put a gps apparatus on the camera.

Canon EOS M.

Canon EOS M.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jul 27

Dean-1Dean Kenneth Crum, born 09JULY2013 to Doug and Diane Crum. Yet another grandchild, making it 8. He’s a real cutie, and well behaved. May he always grow in wisdom and strength and love for the Lord. Opa will need to take him on his first backpack trip, and help him enjoy his first cigar and beer.

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Jan 26

Deer Denis;

I weally twy to katch awl mi speling mysteaks. I weally doo. Butt i m knot a superman lik Obama. I doen’t haf a telle-prompter lik himm. So i meak misteaks. I awso gouf oup mi grammer wonce in a whil and doen’t katch it. Sowwy.

Bwoder kin

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