Oct 20

Reformation: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow, by Carl Trueman ★★★★★

This book is small and short, a compilation of a series of four lectures he gave at a conference in Wales in 1999. Contrary to the other book I had just reviewed by Trueman (Republocrat), I loved this book. It is light reading, in that it is composed as lectures. Trueman spares no punches. Trueman’s concern is the church, and these lectures are addressed to both intending to go into the ministry. The first lecture addresses the relevance of the Reformation in our day. Trueman addresses excesses, both in forgetting the lessons of the Reformation, but also the excess of idolizing the Reformation, and putting a halt to the principle that we need to be ever reforming the church. Perhaps both excesses are just as dangerous. The second chapter addresses the Bible as a book of sorrow, and speaks of how our fun-loving entertainment culture makes pleasure/happiness our goals even from the pulpit perspective. The third lecture refers back to the Scripture being our sole guide, and how ministers must have a total command of the Scriptures, including a mastery of Biblical languages and systematic theology. The final lecture wraps up with a discussion of our assurance in Christ, and how today’s world seeks to identify that assurance through either actions or feelings that we experience, rather than focusing completely on Christ.  This book is a highly relevant read, a reminder of the faith that we have but are so quick to forget.

Add comments

One Response to “Reformation: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow”

  1. Onkel Dennis says:

    ” ministers must have a total command of the Scriptures, including a mastery of Biblical languages and systematic theology.”

    And, I would add, history that has a bearing on the understanding of scripture, including that which comes after the times of the biblical (NT) writings but is mostly forgotten or neglected (or avoided!). The history is even more important than the systematized theology because the refinement of theology in its systematization, while inevitable, also has the effect of freezing it in place as an obstacle to further reform.

Leave a Reply

*

preload preload preload