Jun 20

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6/16 (Thursday) — Jon had come down to Puyallup the night before, and we headed off to Portland just before 7 am, arriving in Portland about 9:45. Our bikes were quickly unloaded at Gaylon’s house,  and Gaylon followed us for 15 miles. Our track went down Division St. to the 205 bicycle path. This we took up across the Columbia River to start the Washington portion of our adventure. We started on the old Evergreen highway until we got to Camas. Two miles before Camas, Gaylon left us to go back home. We were following the Washington alternative to the ACA Lewis and Clark bicycle route, which was not terribly clear. We ended up going through downtown Camas. Just before Camas, it began to rain torrentially. With rain gear on, we pushed forward. There was one significant uphill stretch, but other than that, most of the first day was rolling hills. The worst part was the persistent lack of shoulders to the road, and it was a very busy road, with about 30% trucks that would come uncomfortably close to us.  About an hour of heavy rain led to clearing and sunshine, so the decision to push on and camp out was made. Our camp was in the city park of Home Valley. This worked out well, save that the showers did not work, and that it was close to the train tracks. A train passed through about every hour, blaring it’s horn, which was loud enough to wake us. We did not get the best sleep.

Entering Washington with Gaylon

Entering Washington with Gaylon

Still fresh, ready to ride

Still fresh, ready to ride

View on the Washington side of the Columbia River, west of the mountains

View on the Washington side of the Columbia River, west of the mountains

6/17 (Friday) — We were up at 5:30, had breakfast, and were on the road by 7 am. The road on the Washington side started to have better shoulders, but it was still uncomfortable in some parts, especially in the seven tunnels that we needed to go through. Eventually, we got to the Dalles bridge, which did not have a bicycle lane, but was not to uncomfortable to get across. The weather was cool and cloudy, making for some good timing on the ride, and we got into the Dalles just before noon. Jon decided that he wanted to stop, so we found a cheap dive of a hotel to stay in. After some walking around town, we went out to dinner and prepared for the next day.

View of the Columbia River, Washington side, east of the mountains

View of the Columbia River, Washington side, east of the mountains

6/18 (Saturday) — Taking off on the road a little after 7 am, we were able to get onto the historic old Columbia River highway. Jon and I were now headed westward. Once we arrived in Rowena, we realized that a major bicycle event was occurring to raise money for completing the gorge bicycle trail. The climb up the Rowena curves to the lookout was fairly impressive, and immensely beautiful. The road immediately dropped down to Mosier (pronounced Moe-zure) and then started climbing on a bicycle only trail. There were the Mosier twin tunnels to go through, a bit more climbing, and then a descent into Hood River. Hood River was a rather hilly town, but on the western outskirts, the map put us onto I-84 for 11 miles. Getting off at Wyeth Bench Road, we stopped for lunch at the state park, only to have heavy rains start again. We had some additional and substantial climbing to do on Herman Creek Road, but it nicely dropped us into Cascade Locks. It had only temporarily stopped raining, and so considered seriously a hotel. They were either way too expensive, or full, owing to an event going on in town the night we needed to stay over. So, we stayed in the Marina, along with other cycle tourists, and also a SoBo PCT hiker. We enjoyed dinner with her at the brewery in the Marina, and then crashed early, sleeping well, but with episodes of quite heavy rain. The tent kept us dry, but things were quite wet.

Rowena Crest

Rowena Crest

A look down on the climb up to Rowena Crest

A look down on the climb up to Rowena Crest

Entering the Mosier tunnels

Entering the Mosier tunnels

Camping at Cascade Locks Marina

Camping at Cascade Locks Marina

6/19 (Sunday) — We got a slightly later 7:30 start this morning, but there were only a few clouds in the sky, and it was quite beautiful. This section I’ve done a few times before, but never on the touring bike headed in a westward direction. The climb to Crown Point was long but rarely more than 6% grade, and we made it back to Gaylon’s house by slightly after 12 noon. After chatting a bit with Gaylon, we loaded our bicycles and bags and took off back to Puyallup, and Jon back to Arlington.

Bonneville Dam from the bicycle trail

Bonneville Dam from the bicycle trail

Goodbye to a beautiful river.

Goodbye to a beautiful river.

All in all, it was a fantastic ride. I did not like the Washington side, and will never do that side again. The Oregon side was quite impressive. It was a total delight to be able to do this with Jonathan. I look forward to more rides with him.

 

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May 21

ChallengeOfRainier

The Challenge of Rainier, by Dee Molenaar (4th Edition) ★★★★★

I’ve seen this book around for many years sitting on shelves in the bookstores, but never bothered to purchase a copy to read. It seemed that the time was ripe. Mt. Rainier is in many ways my favorite mountain. It’s in my backyard, and I frequently bicycle its perimeter. I’ve climbed it twice. I’ve hiked the Wonderland trail twice. I’ve yet to have a truly bad moment on the mountain, even though rain has occasionally terminated an adventure on the mountain. Mt. Rainier is of particular note in that many of America’s most famous Himalayan climbers learned their craft on this mountain. It is frequently acclaimed to be the most photogenic mountain in the world. My love for the mountain has extended to all seasons, doing winter ski trips into the park, spending other times hiking the trails for the day, cycling around the mountain, and always standing in awe of it. Thus, learning more of the history of the mountain was most gripping to me. Dee writes very well, and it is hard to put the book down. He chronicles the first climbs of each of the main routes, the development of the park, recounts tragedies that occurred in the park, discusses famous and interesting characters who have climbed to the summit, and discusses the challenges of the park rangers in keeping the mountain safe for all who approach its flanks. Chapter 35, In Retrospect, hit a tender spot with me. Though my experiences on Rainier are far fewer and less intense than the author, we both share the deep sentimentality of the majesty and grandeur of the mountain, the respect for its challenges that it offers the visitor, and its desire to see it preserved from careless human ambition. I’d encourage any and all that have have fallen in love with Mt. Rainier to read this book, and to delight in the perspective of the mountain man on the greatest of American mountains.

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May 06

Spandex

Spandex Optional, by Peter Rice ★★★★

This is a short but cute little book about bicycle touring. It is an easy read, taking me about 2 hours to get through it on a leisurely basis. Peter discusses cycle touring from a non-traditional perspective. Some advice is not the best, such as riding any old beat up bicycle on a long distance tour. Much advice is great, such as just getting on the bike and doing it. The most salient theme was to simply RYOR (ride your own ride), using a similar phrase often used in the thru-hiking community (to hike your own hike); i.e., do it your way, as everybody will have their own individual style of doing a long-distance ride. It’s a nice read for anybody who feels that long-distance cycling must be performed in a certain fashion, such as wearing spandex shorts.

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Apr 30

Just Ride

By Kenneth Feucht books No Comments »

JustRide

Just Ride, by Grant Petersen ★★★★

This is a cute little book of 89 chapters in 208 pages, giving advice on cycling. Grant Petersen founded Rivendell Bicycle Works, notes that he used to ride competitively, but now speaks strongly about the art of simply riding a bicycle and enjoying the endeavor. Advice fits into a number of categories, including how to ride a bicycle, what to wear, how to ride a bicycle safely, how to do the bicycle for health reasons, accessories for the bike, how to care for a bike, technical aspects of bicycle design, and philosophy of cycling. I disagree with some of what he has to say, but agree that his perspective on making bicycling an enjoyable pastime needs to be considered strongly by anybody riding a bike. It is a fun read, Grant writes well, and it will prove to serve as worthy advice even when he is not entirely correct.

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Apr 12

Stealing America

By Kenneth Feucht books 1 Comment »

StealingAmerica

Stealing America, by Dinesh D’Souza ★★★★

This book is actually two narratives. The first narrative regards Dinesh’s stay for 8 months in an overnight retention facility, and the sentencing that led to that retention. Each chapter has stories from his sentencing or life in the confinement center. The second narrative spring-boards from the first narrative, in identifying how the US government is operating in an increasingly criminal fashion, akin to the hardened criminals that Dinesh met while at the detention facility.

The first chapter speaks of Dinesh being caught for a crime that seemed somewhat insignificant and something that is performed all the time, but felony charges are avoided because high profile people are aware of the minor technicalities in helping one avoid the label of “crime” to the “mis-deed”. Dinesh accidentally gave beyond donation limits by giving to a candidate through friends. He could have given massively larger funds through a PAC or other agency, but because he did what he did and had enemies, he was labeled a felon and ultimately condemned to 8 months in a confinement center, though avoiding up to 3 years of prison by paying his life earnings to a high profile lawyer. Having personally seen enough of the court systems, I can heartily agree with D’Souza that courts are a political sham; they are not blind, and justice is NEVER served in the courts. They are highly politically motivated by extremist liberal social justice warriors with an agenda. The myth of the American court system is screamed loud and hard in the sentencing of D’Souza.

Chapter two outlines the confinement center, a description of some of the people confined within the center. The description paints the guards and personnel that run the center as more pathological than the inmates. The criminals in the center, while they created heinous crimes (and oftentimes did not!), are described as less criminal than the people that run this country. The theme of “theft” and “stealing” is beginning to be developed in this chapter, where inmates may have performed robberies, but the grander robberies are daily performed in full public eye by our politicians.

The next few chapters begin to develop certain themes. These themes are based on the crimes that inmates committed, and how the politicians that run this country have the same pathological mindset as the inveterate criminals locked up behind bars. Gangsterism is one theme. Through their particular gangs (Republican or Democratic Parties), the once innocent politician goes from poverty to unbelievable wealth, which cannot be explained by their salary as a public servant. The reparations scam is another, where astronomical payouts to an undeserving dependent class of people are made even more dependent on the system, all under the guise of repaying groups for some hypothetical crime allegedly committed against their distant forefathers by people that have been dead for many generations. The greed and inequality scam is how the government feels it is their duty to level the playing field of inequality by the continual redistribution of wealth. The only wealth not redistributed is that of the leaders. Another scam is labeled the “You didn’t build that scam”, or as I would say, “it takes a village” scam. This supposes that you would never have been able to accomplish anything in life if it wasn’t for the government, failing to realize that the government would not have existed without yours and your forefather’s taxes being paid. The “you didn’t build it scam” give the government the permission to steal your earnings for redistribution.

D’Souza then switches gears and discusses the life of Saul Alinsky. Saul spent much time with Al Capone, learning first hand the art of gangsterism. This is relevant, because two characters, Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton both admittedly spent much time under the tutelage of Saul Alinsky, Clinton  writing her senior thesis on Alinsky, while Obama worked under him as a civic organizer. The criminal nature of Obama and Clinton are then both detailed.

The last two chapters bewail how America has been “stolen” from the people, and offering a solution as to how to crack the deception. He really doesn’t offer much, suggesting only that we need to restore the original America that did not steal from its citizens. I didn’t expect profound solutions from D’Souza, as he really doesn’t see the full impact of what has gone wrong with our nation.

There are some serious problems with the book. First, Dinesh identifies the “problem” as starting with Bill Clinton and exacerbated by the Bushes and Obama. In actual fact, the problems of corrupt government in the USA goes back to its founding, with founding fathers stacking the constitution in its own favor. I would identify progressivism as we know it as starting with Teddy Roosevelt and ultimately “losing it” with Woodrow Wilson. We are simply seeing the end result of a 100 years of deterioration in our government, making it unrecognizable should any of the founding fathers return from the dead. The second problem with the book is that Dinesh tends to think the problem of a stolen America to be primarily a Democrat problem. In actual fact, as recent events have shown quite clearly, the Republican party is way too similar to the Democratic party, and their politics tend to differ less than the politicians would like us to think. The Democratic Party is not the only criminal gang, but there are two criminal rival gangs fighting for preeminence on the public stage. As a side issue to the Republican party, D’Souza gives inordinate praise to president Lincoln, a man worthy of praise, but omits that he, more than any other president before him, established an uncontrollably powerful central government, much to our loss and giving rise to all of the problems D’Souza wails on in his book. By decentralizing government, empowering states and empowering the 10th amendment, reducing taxation and eliminating unwanted tariffs, Lincoln could have both abolished slavery and preserved the union without a war. The third problem is that D’Souza was affected by a wantonly corrupt court system in bed with the reigning politicians. Yet, he really doesn’t grasp the entire nature of how and why our court systems no longer administer justice or freedom. I am a little astounded as to why he is so blind to this issue. The fourth problem affects Dinesh as much as the country and that is a loss of faith. Dinesh fails to ever bring out that the primary reason America has gone the way it has, is that there is no longer a Christian morality, a Christian ethos, or a Christian faith in America. Dinesh, through his past divorce, seems to have somehow lost it himself. True, he still identifies as a Christian, but this book would leave you thinking that he only has a Christian gloss; there is nothing in this book that conveys a serious Christian mindset. By that, I mean a mindset that holds God in control of the universe, in control of politics, and a moral God that will judge the sins of the nation. His morality seems to be a morality that is entirely utilitarian in its function to maintain a civil society. This is not the morality of Scripture. I dearly hope that D’Souza will some day soon come to the realization of the problems above and write a book that can encompass a true reckoning of the spiritual and political state of affairs of our nation.

The book is a depressing book. It’s not that I’ve learned something new in the book. It’s that it’s all been reinforced from a person that tended to be very optimistic about our political system and the fruits of that political system. What’s most depressing is to grasp at how few people in America realize that we are a country that has gone off the cliff and is in free-fall without a parachute. People quibbling over whether Sanders or Hillary or Cruz gets the presidency are like kids playing on the deck of the Titanic during its final hours—”the boat’s going down children, and it isn’t worth haggling over whether Suzy stepped on the line in the hopscotch game”.

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