Nov 30

trump

Trump: The Art of the Deal, by Donald J. Trump and Tony Schwartz ★★★★

I received this autographed hardback copy before Donald was elected president, and read it in spurts after that. The book’s value is in giving one an insight into how Trump thinks.  The book was written in 1987, and starts with a review of one week in his life, ending with a follow-up of what became of the decisions of that week. The intervening chapters are a limited autobiography of the man, starting from childhood, through his schooling, and then summarizing his early big deals up to 1987. The details of his wheeling-dealing is not terribly interesting save for realizing a few things. 1. Seeing how Trump makes decisions. He always looks for people that he could trust, and who are the best in the business. His biggest admiration is for people of integrity. 2. Seeing how politics affects the most mundane things in life, and how Trump was able to use as well as was hindered by politics. 3. Seeing how bumbling so many other business executives were. There were many examples of very poor decision making, not just in government real estate projects, but also in private interest projects that should never have gone wrong, but did.

This book is of value to read in order to understand the way in which Trump makes decisions. He is neither conservative nor liberal. He is not Republican or Democrat, his religious leaning is toward Christian predominance, and he is not an extreme moralist (or immoralist–he neither smokes nor drinks). Donald is very much a pragmatist, that tends to set goals and hold to those goals. He is not an ideologue, though tends to have guiding principles. He is a great negotiator who is used to holding his cards close to himself, which might irk the ever-snooping main stream media and liberals. He has a strong tendency toward honest success, which we will probably see in the next four years.

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Oct 24

seekingallah

Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus, by Nabeel Qureshi ★★★★

This is an autobiography of the conversion of Nabeel Qureshi from a devout Muslim faith to Christianity. Nabeel was born in the USA, but grew up in a Pakistani Muslim family belonging to a sect called the Ahmadi. Living in Virginia, he was challenged in his faith by a close Christian friend David Wood. David and Nabeel met in high school, and continued on together in college, until Nabeel eventually applied to and was accepted into medical school. Through a number of years and Nabeel seeking inconsistencies in his faith, he finally had a series of dreams which led him to become a Christian. The book is written in multiple very short chapters, and so is somewhat spasmodic or convulsive  in the way it is read. There is a lengthy appendage to the book. I appreciated this book as a means of describing the challenges of bringing a Muslim person to faith in Christ. Nabeel has written several other books, one on Jihad and another on the distinctives of Muslim versus Christian theology.

Because Nabeel grew up in the USA and to a small sect of the Muslim faith, he is somewhat lacking in seeing the result of a large community of regular Sunni or Shiite Muslims. I am not challenging Nabeel of deficits in knowledge of the Muslim faith, but note that having lived for a while in two Muslim countries (Bangladesh and Extrem Nord Cameroon), my picture of the Muslim faith in those countries (as can be found in most Muslim countries) is less romantic than his views. The people appear bound by an ugly task-master of an intolerant god, with joyless worship of this uncaring and merciless otherworld being. Nabeel shows a kinder, gentler Muslim faith more closely related to its Christian roots, explaining why it is dangerous to categorize all Muslims as dangerous jihadists. Note that I view the Muslim faith as a Christian heresy (which it is!). This kinder, gentler subset of Muslims probably represents a small minority of Muslims just as most “Christians” are Christian in name only. The only problem is in being able to sort out one from the other.

Qureshi shows the reader the formidable challenge of witnessing to the Muslim. The most important aspect is not in having an encyclopedic knowledge of Muslim faith and doctrine, but in simply being able to share clearly the Christian faith, including the resurrection of Christ, the doctrine of the trinity, the formation of the canon of Scripture, etc., and to know why these doctrines are important.

Qureshi continues to write. He has appended this book to fill in 10 years of time since he first became a Christian. He frankly discusses the problems of his family rejecting him for his faith. He discusses finishing medical school, but deciding upon going into the ministry instead, and now works with Ravi Zacharias. Only recently in the news is it known that Nabeel has an advanced gastric cancer and probably will not live too much longer. It will be sad to see the loss of such an interesting person.

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Sep 05


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Labor Day 05SEPT2016 Hike with Flanagan Boys

The Flanagan kids were under Betsy and my care for Labor Day since Sarah was involved and Andrew had to work. We decided that they needed some excitement, so took them for a hike. The hike started at Sunrise, and we took one false turn onto the Huckleberry Creek trail, which led us about a mile and quite a few 100 feet elevation loss, which we had to retrace. The kids were very reluctant to pursue our goal, but the promise of Snicker bars at the Fremont Lookout Tower spurred them on. We did achieve the Fremont Lookout, as can be seen from the above photo. They were rather tired on return to the car, so we awarded them with a trip (at their choosing) to McDonalds.

A gaze down the valley of the Huckleberry Creek trail

A gaze down the valley of the Huckleberry Creek trail

The saddle where the main trail and Huckleberry Creek trail split. The children are squinting from the sunlight.

The saddle where the main trail and Huckleberry Creek trail split. The children are squinting from the sunlight.

Another view from Mt. Fremont. There were many dozens of mountain goats that can be seen. Click on the picture to blow it up.

Another view from Mt. Fremont. There were many dozens of mountain goats that can be seen. Click on the picture to blow it up.

Looking back at Mt. Rainier and Burroughs Mountain from the Fremont Lookout

Looking back at Mt. Rainier and Burroughs Mountain from the Fremont Lookout

The kids a bit colder in the thin air of Fremont Mountain. Sammy discovers here the infamous Stone of Fremont

The kids a bit colder in the thin air of Fremont Mountain. Sammy discovers here the infamous Stone of Fremont

Here are the Garmin hiking stats and route we traveled, just in case you are curious.

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Sep 03

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Rampart Ridge on Mt. Rainier up to vanTrump Park 03SEPT2016

Jonny and I did this hike today with the cooler weather. The mid-mountain remained engulfed in clouds throughout the day, so that most of our hiking was done in mist. Though I would have loved the grand views of the mountain that can be seen on this set of trails, there was a different spectacular beauty to be seen, including looking through the mist to see a very large herd of mountain goats on the ridge adjacent to the one we were ascending.

This trail rarely was ever flat, most of it being either fairly steep climbing or descending. The route started at Longmire, and the trail quickly ascending from Longmire up to Rampart Ridge. The trail then followed the ridge, most the time ascending until a lookout is reached overlooking Longmire. From there, the trail either descends or is flat until the Wonderland Trail is achieved at 3 miles. After descending 0.2 miles on the Wonderland Trail, it again takes off on a fairly steep ascent up the ridge to VanTrump Park. You can see the herd of goats above that we saw in VanTrump Park. We continued on for a distance further on an unmaintained trail further up the ridge, but realized that we would not get out of the clouds until we moved onto glacier, not a smart idea. The descent went much quicker than the ascension. We were freezing at the top of VanTrump Park, so were glad to get down to warmer climate. Everything was quite wet, and there was extensive plant life growing over the trail making our shoes and pants soaking wet. It was also tricky, since there were abundant tree roots on the trail, and one knows how slippery they could be. By the time we got most of the way down, we encountered the hoi polloi struggling up the trail, most hoping to achieve a fraction of the distance that we accomplish, and sadly missing the spectacular views that we were able to see.

Jon fresh in eager to hike mode

Jon fresh in eager to hike mode

Blode Ziegen in die Wolken

Another view of VanTrump Park looking up toward the mountain.

Jon having lunch at the summit of our excursion

Jon having lunch at the summit of our excursion

VanTrump Park. Looked for Trump but he wasn't there...he was in Detroit

VanTrump Park. Looked for Trump but he wasn’t there…he was in Detroit.You can see the blöde Ziegen in the distance in die Wolken.

Nisqually River view from Longmire viewpoint on Rampart Ridge. It was not be possible to see this at the start of our hike since the valley was engulfed in clouds.

Nisqually River view from Longmire viewpoint on Rampart Ridge. It was not be possible to see this at the start of our hike since the valley was engulfed in clouds.

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Aug 24

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White Pass to Crystal Mountain on the PCT, 21-23AUG2016

The last trip report had Pete, Russ and I going from Waptus Lake to White Pass. This is now a continuation with just Russ and I from White Pass to Crystal Mountain Ski Resort. It was also two nights, and along the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT). Both Russ and I are now packing a bit lighter, and a bit wiser. To coordinate matters, I dropped my car off at Crystal Mountain, and then Kim Andersen drove us to White Pass and left us to our own devices. The start of the trail was a touch obscure, but we were soon on our way. The first day had beautiful weather with a few scattered clouds, but cool, and no bugs. There was much up and down along the trail, but with lighter packs, we seemed to handle it quite well. We passed multiple lakes, and what I thought would be somewhat monotonous scenery (the long green tunnel) was everything but that. We finally set up camp at Snow Lake.

Day 2, we traversed from Snow Lake to Dewey Lake. It was cloudy the entire day, and most the time, we were hiking in the clouds. We would have had views of Mt. Rainier, which were clouded out today. The scenery persisted in being totally spectacular, and much of the trail actually went through Mt. Rainier National Park. During this hike, I am still experimenting with my Garmin eTrex 30t, and was informed at the end of the day that the battery ran out. Thus, I do not have a complete record. We hiked between 16-17 miles, and climbed about 3000 feet.

Wolkenbergwanderung

Wolkenbergwanderung

Russ waking up at Snow Lake and disorganizing his stuff.

Russ waking up at Snow Lake and disorganizing his stuff.

A hike in the clouds

A hike in the clouds

Russ chilling out at Dewey Lake

Russ chilling out at Dewey Lake

Day 3, we got a little later start of 7:30, and started immediately with a climb up to highway 410 (Chinook Pass). On the way, we encountered Smiles, and then two girls, Old School and Mama Goose, all thru-hikers from Campo. All were putting in 25-30 mile days, carrying packs under 25 lb, and looking as fresh as the first day on the trail. I’m deeply jealous. Maybe 2018? Past Hwy 410, we had another 1800 ft of climbing, reaching Sheep Lake and then Sourdough gap. At Sourdough gap, Russ took off like a jack rabbit chasing the bunnies, and then took a trail off of the PCT, perhaps thinking it was a short cut to Crystal. Fortunately, I caught him quickly enough to correct our course. We continued on the Bear Gap, where there were several trails that took us back to our car. The Crystal Mountain portion of the hike was a little less enjoyable. We stopped at Wallys on the way home, where Russ was able to experience the Waltimate Burger.

Looking down on Dewey Lake

Looking down on Dewey Lake

Heading toward Hwy 410

Heading toward Hwy 410

The never-ending trail

The never-ending trail

From Sourdough Gap, looking back on Sheep Lake with Mt. Adams in the distance.

From Sourdough Gap, looking back on Sheep Lake with Mt. Adams and Goat Rocks in the distance.

From these two hikes, Russ and I both learned the value of going lighter. We were able to talk to many of the thru-hikers and glean knowledge from them as to the methods of their journeys. The common theme was to go lighter, from the pack, to the food you carry, your tent and sleeping accommodations, to your clothes and food. I remain puzzled how many thru-hikers carried cell phones, and yet kept them charged. I saw only a few carrying solar chargers on their packs.

I’ve used the Halfmile maps, and they were extremely helpful in planning the route, and finding your way once on the journey. I was using two year old maps, and the mile markers for this years maps are slightly different by 10 miles. I never needed the Garmin to determine my location, though I’m sure it might help in the Sierras where the route isn’t as clear.

The first hike this year was into Rachel Lake with Peter Tate, and I forgot to bring my trekking poles. It was a totally miserable hike, and I was unstable, falling a lot, and unsure in any sort of tricking footing, like stream crossing. These last two hikes were now with my hiking poles, and what a difference they make. You can hike faster because you can easily catch yourself when you become unsteady. You can lessen the impact when descending. Stream crossing is still slow, but far less unsure. I will never forget my hiking poles again!

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